The following resources have been developed by a Working Group of the Department of Health and Human Services Victoria.
A person who lacks capacity to complete an Advance Care Directive, or other advance care planning document for themself, may have known values and preferences for future healthcare. These preferences and values may have been: (i) communicated verbally; (ii) inferred from the way the person has lived their life and made other decisions; or (iii) based on observations about how they cope with their health issues and medical interventions.
These preferences and values can be recorded, by one or more people who know the person well, in the form, ‘What I understand to be the person’s preferences and values’. Note: this form is not an Advance Care Planning document. Only documents completed by a person with capacity for themself are advance care planning documents or Advance Care Directives.

Preferences and Values form for another person: information to help guide future medical decisions for a person who is unable to express their own preferences
This form records information about a person who cannot express their preferences about medical treatment. What you write in this form will help the Medical Treatment Decision Maker and health professionals to make medical decisions that the person would want. This form is only for people who cannot make medical decisions or express what they want

Clinician Guide to medical decision making for when the person lacks capacity to undertake advance care planning. 
This guide covers five areas that relate to making medical treatment decisions for a person who lacks medical decision making capacity to consent to their own treatment or to refuse that treatment:
1. Medical decision making framework
2. The role of the Medical Treatment Decision Maker
3. Using Advance Care Directives
4. The form, ‘What I understand to be the person’s preferences and values’
5. Translating preferences & values into a medical treatment plan

Consumer Guide: A medical treatment decision maker’s guide for when the person lacks capacity to undertake advance care planning. This guide is to help those who might one day have to make a medical decision for someone else.

Medical Treatment Plans
Preferences and Values expressed in an Advance Care Directive or in some other way can be combined with medical knowledge about the person’s illness to develop a doctor-completed medical treatment plan. In hospitals, these plans may be known as a ‘Goals of Care Plan’ or ‘Resuscitation Plan’. A Residential Aged Care Goals of Care form is also available and an example is below. These medical treatment plans can be completed by a doctor for a person who lacks medical decision capacity or for a person who has medical decision making capacity.
Generic Residential Aged Care Facility Goals of Care Form
Northern Health Residential Aged Care Facility Goals of Care Form
If you would like further information about the resources for people who lack capacity or the Residential Aged Care Goals of Care form, contact Dr Barbara Hayes at Barbara.Hayes@nh.org.au

Presentation: Clinical implications of the Medical Treatment Planning and Decisions Act 2016: https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/about/news-and-events/videos/ACP-forum-2017-Clinical-Consideration-Dr-B-Hayes
This presentation was given at the 2017 Victorian ACP Forum and discusses the clinical implications of the Medical Treatment Planning and Decisions Act and the organisational changes health services will need to consider prior to it coming into effect on 12 March 2018. This presentation also discusses the clinical implications the Act will have when treating people without decision making capacity.